Appendices

Additional information

Appendix A: Resources

This appendix provides details of the AEC’s resources and expenses in 2018–19, as required by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit Requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and other non corporate Commonwealth entities, 25 June 2015.

The tables in this appendix correspond to tables in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2018–19 and staff statistics, namely:

  • the Agency Resource Statement, which provides information about the various funding sources that the AEC was able to draw on during the year (Table 5)
  • Expenses and Resources by Outcome, showing the detail of Budget appropriations and total resourcing for Outcome 1 (Table 6)
  • Average staffing levels from 2016–17 to 2018–19 (Table 7)
Table 5: Agency resource statement – current report period (2018–19)
Actual appropriation for 2018‑19
$’000
Payments made for 2018‑19
$’000
Balance remaining 2018‑19
$’000
Ordinary annual servicesa
Prior Year Departmental appropriation   117,564 107,208 10,356
Departmental appropriationb   401,183 252,512 148,671
Section 74 relevant agency receipts   20,553 20,553
Total ordinary annual servicesc A 539,300 380,273 159,027
Special appropriations
Special appropriations limited by criteria/entitlement
Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Administered)   55,077 55,077
Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Departmental)   14,900 14,900
Total special appropriations B 69,977 69,977
Special accountsd
Opening balance   1,328  
Non-appropriation receipts to special accounts   3,483  
Payments made   538  
Total special accounts C 4,811 538 4,273
Total resourcing (A + B + C )   614,088 450,788  
Total net resourcing for agency   614,088 450,788  
  1. Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2018–19 and Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2018–19. This also includes prior year departmental appropriation and section 74 relevant agency receipts.
  2. Includes an amount of $13.572 million in 2018–19 for the Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.
  3. The balance remaining includes $4.0 million of appropriations that have been quarantined and are not available to the AEC.
  4. Includes ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Other Trust Monies (OTM) accounts, Services for other Government and Non agency Bodies accounts (SOG) or Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM).
Table 6: Expenses and resources for Outcome 1
  Budgeta 2018‑19
$’000
Actual expenses 2018‑19
$’000
Variation
$’000
Program 1.1
Administered expenses
Special appropriations 76,000 79,502 (3,502)
Departmental expenses
Departmental appropriationb 408,164 408,438 (274)
Special appropriations 14,900 14,900
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 8,821 12,367 (3,546)
Total for Program 1.1 507,885 515,207 (7,322)
Total expenses for Outcome 1 507,885 515,207 (7,322)
  1. Full-year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2018–19 Budget at Additional Estimates.
  2. Departmental appropriation combines ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)’. and ‘Revenue from independent sources (section 74)’, and excludes Departmental Capital Budget.
Table 7: Average staffing levels 2016–17 to 2018–19
  2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Average staffing level (number) 809 795 788

Appendix B: Governance

Accountable authority

Table 8: Accountable Authority–current report period (2018–19)
Period as the accountable authority or member
Name Position title/position held Date of commencement Date of cessation
Mr Tom Rogers

Electoral Commissioner

Australian Electoral Commission

15/12/2014 N/A

Business planning documents

Table 9: Business planning documents
Document Purpose Reviewed
AEC Corporate Plan The AEC’s central planning document. Sets the strategic direction for four years through the agency directions and priority activities. Includes analysis of strategic and enterprise risks, agency capability and operating environment Annually
Business Planning and Performance Reporting Framework Supports staff to deliver outcomes in the AEC corporate plan, manage resources and finances, and supports requirements of the PGPA Act Annually
Business plans (branch/state and territory) Align branch and state/territory activities with business planning and reporting Annually
Election Readiness Framework Sets out and monitors the program of activity required to maintain election readiness Every election cycle
Information Technology Strategic Plan 2018–2022 Sets the AEC’s desired information technology vision to 2022 and is supported by the IT Architecture Plan Every four years
Fraud Control Plan To prevent, detect and respond to fraud in accordance with Commonwealth law, fraud control policies and memorandums of understanding Every two years (or if significant organisational change occurs)
Strategic Risk Management Plan Details strategic risks that affect the AEC and how these will be managed Biannually
Assurance Plan Outlines assurance framework and the operational application in the AEC context Annually
Internal Audit Plan Sets the internal audit program for the financial year (contained within the Assurance Plan) Annually
Business continuity plans Improves resilience to enable continuation of identified time critical business processes during and following a significant disruption to business operations Annually
Disability Inclusion Strategy Identifies relevant target outcomes from the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 Reported on annually
Reconciliation Action Plan Sets activities to recognise and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in internal and external arrangements and activities Annually
Property Plan Direction on long-term management of leased property Annually
Security Plan Strategies to protect staff, visitors, information, equipment and premises against harm, loss, interference and compromise Biannually
Workforce plans (division, branch/ state and territory) The continuous process of identifying and mitigating potential workforce risks and plan future workforce strategies Biannually
AEC Strategic Workforce Plan Examines workforce issues at the organisational level informed by the division, branch and state workforce plans Annually

AEC management committees

Table 10: AEC decision making management committees
Committee Function Members* Meeting frequency
Executive Leadership Team (ELT) Senior management team helping to deliver strategic leadership and operational management EC, DEC, FAC Capability, FAC Network and Elections Operations/ National Election Manager Weekly
Organisational Health Committee Monitors performance, risk management, compliance and controls. Provides advice and recommendations to the ELT DEC; FAC Capability, FAC Network and Election Operations, AC Corporate Services, AC Disclosure, Assurance and Engagement, AC, Roll Management and Community Engagement, AC Information, Communication and Technology, State Manager, Vic, State Manager, SA Monthly
Capability Committee Monitors organisational capability and progresses projects to support strategic direction. Monitors project outputs and significant organisational initiatives, and provides advice on future capability FAC Capability, FAC Network and Election Operations/National Election Manager, Chief Finance Officer, AC Elections, AC Operations, AC Information, Communication and Technology, State Manager, WA, State Manager, QLD Monthly
Learning Governance Committee Provides whole of agency governance to learning and development. Sets strategic direction and operating models and guides the National Training and Education Unit DEC, FAC Network and Election Operations/National Election Manager, AC Corporate Services, AC Operations, AC Elections, State Manager QLD, State Manager NSW, State Manager WA Every four weeks
Business Assurance Committee (BAC) The AEC’s Audit Committee. Provides independent advice and assurance to the Electoral Commissioner on financial and reporting responsibilities, risk oversight and management, system of internal control, and compliance with relevant legislation and rules Three or more members appointed by EC (the majority external to AEC), additional AEC advisers are permitted to attend. In 2018–19, BAC had five members and two AEC advisers Five times per year
Fraud Control Committee (FCC) Advises AEC on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the AEC’s fraud controls, policies and procedures AC Operations, AC Roll Management and Community Engagement, AC Information, Communication and Technology, State Manager Vic, State Manager, Tas Quarterly
National Election Delivery Committee (NEDC) Supports the National Election Manager (NEM) to oversee and monitor preparations for, and successful conduct of, federal electoral events (including by-elections, plebiscites and referendums). The NEM reports regularly on behalf of the NEDC to ELT and the Electoral Commissioner FAC Network and Elections Operations/National Election Manager, all State Managers, ACs (membership expands approaching elections) Regularly: monthly, weekly or daily as required (i.e. in run-up to and during an electoral event)
Security Committee Provides strategic oversight of the AEC’s protective and IT security programs DEC, FAC Capability, FAC Network and Elections Operations/National Election Manager, AC Corporate Services, AC Information, Communication and Technology, State Managers, NSW and Victoria Monthly, with more meetings as required (i.e. in run-up to and during an electoral event)
Work health and safety committees A consultative forum to address health and safety at a national and strategic level, with reference to the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 FAC Capability, management representatives, employee representatives, advisers from Corporate Services Quarterly, and out-of-session as required

* Key: Electoral Commissioner (EC); Deputy Electoral Commissioner (DEC); First Assistant Commissioners (FAC); Assistant Commissioners (AC).

Appendix C: Commonwealth electoral roll information

Enrolment rate and enrolled population

Figure 3: Enrolment rate trend, 9 October 2004–30 June 2019
Graph showing the number of people enrolled, the proportion of eligible Australians enrolled and the target participation, since 2007 and highlighting the enrolment rate at the 20017, 20010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 federal elections. Overall the enrolment rate has grown from 92 per cent to 97.1 per cent.

* An enrolment rate of 96.8 per cent was published at close of rolls for the 2019 federal election. This figure was based on preliminary population estimates. The figure has now been revised to 97.0 per cent for the 2019 federal election (May 2019) and 97.1 percent as at 30 June 2019.

Commonwealth Electoral roll extracts and recipients

Table 11: Recipients of electoral roll extracts 2018–19*
Name Electorate/state Roll data provided Date provided
Hon Linda Burney MP Member for Barton Barton Jul 2018–Mar 19
Ms Nicolle Flint MP Member for Boothby Boothby, Kingston, Mayo Aug 2018–Mar 19
Hon Andrew Gee MP Member for Calare Calare Jul 2018–Mar 19
Mr Andrew Hastie MP Member for Canning Canning Jul 2018–Mar 19
Ms Julia Banks MP Member for Chisholm Chisholm Dec 2018–Mar 19
Mr Andrew Wilkie MP Member for Denison Clark Jul 2018–Mar 19
Mr George Christensen MP Member for Dawson Capricornia, Dawson Jul 2018–Mar 19
Hon Dr Andrew Leigh MP Member for Fenner Canberra, Fenner Aug 2018–Mar 19
Hon Greg Hunt MP Member for Flinders Flinders Aug 2018
Ms Catherine McGowan AO, MP Member for Indi Casey, Indi, Nicholls Jul 2018–Mar 19
Hon Robert Katter MP Member for Kennedy Kennedy Jul 2018–Mar 19
Ms Susan Lamb MP Member for Longman Longman Aug 2018–Mar 19
Hon Bill Shorten MP Member for Maribyrnong Fraser, Maribyrnong Aug 2018–Mar 19
Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP Member for Mayo Barker, Kingston, Mayo, Spence, Sturt Aug 2018–Mar 19
Mr Adam Bandt MP Member for Melbourne Maribyrnong, Melbourne Jul 2018–Mar 19
Hon Michael Danby MP Member of Melbourne Ports Macnamara Mar 2019
Dr Kerryn Phelps AM, MP Member for Wentworth Wentworth Nov 2018–Mar 19
Senator Mehreen Faruqi Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jan 2019–Mar 19
Senator the Hon Concetta Fierravanti-Wells Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator the Hon Marise Payne Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator Lee Rhiannon Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jul 2018–Oct 18
Senator the Hon Arthur Sinodinos AO Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator John Williams Senator for New South Wales New South Wales Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Fraser Anning Senator for Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Andrew Bartlett Senator for Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Aug 18
Senator Pauline Hanson Senator for Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator the Hon Ian Macdonald Senator for Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Barry O’Sullivan Senator for Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Larissa Waters Senator for Queensland Queensland Sep 2018–Mar 19
Senator Cory Bernardi Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator Lucy Gichuhi Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Stirling Griff Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator Sarah Hanson-Young Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Rex Patrick Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator the Hon Anne Ruston Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Tim Storer Senator for South Australia South Australia Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator the Hon Eric Abetz Senator for Tasmania Tasmania Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator Nicholas McKim Senator for Tasmania Tasmania Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Steve Martin Senator for Tasmania Tasmania Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator the Hon Lisa Singh Senator for Tasmania Tasmania Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Peter Whish-Wilson Senator for Tasmania Tasmania Jul 2018–Apr 19
Senator Derryn Hinch Senator for Victoria Victoria Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator James Paterson Senator for Victoria Victoria Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Janet Rice Senator for Victoria Victoria Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann Senator for Western Australia Western Australia Dec 2018–Apr 19
Senator Peter Georgiou Senator for Western Australia Western Australia Jul 2018–Mar 19
Senator Dean Smith Senator for Western Australia Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19

* Between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019.

Table 12: Registered political parties provided with electoral roll extracts 2018–19*
Registered political party Roll data provided Date provided
Animal Justice Party New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Christians Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Conservatives Party National Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Country Party Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Greens National Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Labor Party (ALP) National Jul 2018–Apr 19
Australian Liberty Alliance Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
Centre Alliance South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Democratic Labour Party (DLP) New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Health Australia Party Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
Jacqui Lambie Network Tasmania Jul 2018–Apr 19
Liberal Democratic Party New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Liberal National Party of Queensland Queensland Jul 2018–Apr 19
Liberal Party of Australia National Jul 2018–Apr 19
Liberal Party of Australia (SA Division) South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
National Party of Australia New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
National Party of Australia – New South Wales New South Wales Aug 2018–Apr 19
National Party of Australia – Victoria Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
National Party of Australia – (SA) Inc South Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting) New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Queensland, Western Australia Aug 2018–Apr 19
Queensland Greens Queensland Jul 2018–Apr 19
Republican Party of Australia New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Rise Up Australia Party Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
Science Party New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
The Greens NSW New South Wales Jul 2018–Apr 19
The Greens – Victoria Branch Victoria Jul 2018–Apr 19
The Greens (WA) Inc Western Australia Jul 2018–Apr 19
United Australia Party New South Wales, Queensland Jan 2019–Apr 19
Voluntary Euthanasia Party New South Wales Jan 2019–Apr 19

* Between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019.

Table 13: Government departments and agencies provided with electoral roll extracts 2018–19*
Institution Data provided
Aug 2018 Nov 2018 Feb 2019 May 2019
Australian Bureau of Statistics Yes
Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Yes
Australian Federal Police Yes Yes Yes
Australian Financial Security Authority Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australian Securities and Investments Commission Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australian Security Intelligence Organisation Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australia Sports Anti-doping Authority Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australian Taxation Office Yes Yes Yes Yes
Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre Yes Yes Yes
Commonwealth Superannuation Commission Yes Yes Yes
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – Australian Passport Office Yes Yes Yes Yes
Department of Home Affairs Yes Yes Yes Yes
Services Australia (Formerly Department of Human Services) Yes Yes Yes

* Between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019.

Table 14: Medical and electoral researchers provided with electoral roll extracts 2018–19*
Contact, institution Data provided
Electoral researchers
Dr Betsy Blunsdon, Executive Director, Australian Consortium for Social and Political Research Incorporated A random sample of 2,500 records of men and women in two-year age ranges across all states and territories for the study ‘2018 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes: Religion’
Mr Adam Zammit, Director of Operations, Australian Consortium for Social and Political Research Incorporated A random sample of 2,500 records of men and women in two-year age ranges across all states and territories for the study ‘2019 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes: Social Inequality’
Medical researchers  
Professor Margaret Allman-Fairnelli, Chief Investigator of the MYMeals Study, University of Sydney A random sample of 1,000 records of men and women 18 to 30 years old across 36 NSW electorates for the study ‘Measuring Young Adults’ Meals (MYMeals)’
Professor Dr Eugene Athan, Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) A random sample of 10,116 records of men and women 18 years and older across seven Victorian electorates for the study ‘Controlling Buruli ulcer in Victoria: Case Control Study’

* Between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019.

Table 15: Provision of electoral roll information to organisations verifying identity for financial purposes 2018–19*

Under subsection 90B(4) of the Electoral Act, private sector organisations may receive roll information for identity verification processes related to the Financial Transactions Reports Act 1988 and the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006.

Institution Data provided
  Aug 2018 Nov 2018 Feb 2019 May 2019
illion (Dunn and Bradstreet / FCS online) Yes Yes
Equifax (VEDA Advantage Information Services and Solutions Ltd (EQUIFAX) Yes Yes Yes Yes

* Between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019.

Appendix D: Electoral events data

2019 federal election

Nominations

Table 16: Nominations data
  House of Representatives (151 vacancies) Senate
(40 vacancies)
Total Male Female Gender not specified
Nominations
accepted
1,056 * 458 1,514 994 519 1

* One candidate for the House of Representatives withdrew their nomination.

Table 17: Breakdown of House of Representative nominations by state and territory
State/territory Seats Nominations
New South Wales 47 315
Victoria 38 258
Queensland 30 223
Western Australia 16 132
South Australia 10 65
Tasmania 5 32
Australian Capital Territory 3 19
Northern Territory 2 12
Australia 151 1,056 *

* One candidate for the House of Representatives withdrew their nomination.

Table 18: Breakdown of Senate nominations by state and territory
State/territory Seats* Nominations
New South Wales 6 105
Victoria 6 82
Queensland 6 83
Western Australia 6 67
South Australia 6 42
Tasmania 6 44
Australian Capital Territory 2 17
Northern Territory 2 18
Australia 40 458

* The 2019 federal election was a half Senate election, so 40 Senate seats were vacant.

Voting

Table 19: House of Representatives votes by type
State/territory Ordinary votes Absent votes Pre-poll* votes Postal votes Provisional votes Total
New South Wales 4,206,944 194,182 185,304 278,467 14,490 4,879,387
Victoria 3,135,885 161,828 184,014 382,582 11,149 3,875,458
Queensland 2,432,981 108,349 117,343 308,657 8,978 2,976,308
Western Australia 1,195,932 81,012 72,931 125,233 7,341 1,482,449
South Australia 929,136 51,490 34,012 106,776 5,436 1,126,850
Tasmania 313,322 12,191 9,138 28,113 1,198 363,962
Australian Capital Territory 243,915 5,412 11,615 13,683 966 275,591
Northern Territory 96,251 2,218 6,023 3,659 460 108,611
TOTAL 12,554,366 616,682 620,380* 1,247,170 50,018 15,088,616

* reflects pre-poll declarations only, and does not reflect the total number of early votes.

Table 20: Senate votes by type
State/territory Ordinary votes Absent votes Pre-poll votes* Postal votes Provisional votes Total
New South Wales 4,209,014 204,332 186,496 277,913 27,717 4,905,472
Victoria 3,136,433 171,484 185,219 381,339 21,761 3,896,236
Queensland 2,433,629 119,700 118,114 306,898 21,031 2,999,372
Western Australia 1,196,330 88,960 73,316 124,543 14,383 1,497,532
South Australia 929,361 54,802 34,187 106,635 9,571 1,134,556
Tasmania 313,365 12,581 9,165 28,039 2,122 365,272
Australian Capital Territory 244,040 5,602 11,682 13,635 1,692 276,651
Northern Territory 96,318 2,265 6,038 3,633 740 108,994
TOTAL 12,558,490 659,726 624,217* 1,242,635 99,017 15,184,085

*reflects pre-poll declarations only, and does not reflect the total number of early votes.

Table 21: 2019 Senate elections, breakdown of above the line and below the line votes
State/territory Above the line Below the line Total Above the line % Above the line % swing
New South Wales 4,372,835 322,491 4,695,326 93.13 -1.47
Victoria 3,524,271 215,172 3,739,443 94.25 -0.44
Queensland 2,701,599 199,865 2,901,464 93.11 -0.75
Western Australia 1,367,694 78,929 1,446,623 94.54 0.06
South Australia 1,012,010 82,813 1,094,823 92.44 0.94
Tasmania 256,445 95,543 351,988 72.86 0.98
Australian Capital Territory 210,204 60,027 270,231 77.79 -7.03
Northern Territory 96,296 8,731 105,027 91.69 0.26
TOTAL 13,541,354 1,063,571 14,604,925 92.72% -0.75%
Table 22: 2019 Senate elections, breakdown of informal votes by state and territory
State/territory Formal votes Informal votes Total Informal % Swing %
New South Wales 4,695,326 210,146 4,905,472 4.28 -0.24
Victoria 3,739,443 156,793 3,896,236 4.02 -0.18
Queensland 2,901,464 97,908 2,999,372 3.26 -0.14
Western Australia 1,446,623 50,909 1,497,532 3.40 0.05
South Australia 1,094,823 39,733 1,134,556 3.50 0.17
Tasmania 351,988 13,284 365,272 3.64 0.16
Australian Capital Territory 270,231 6,420 276,651 2.32 0.11
Northern Territory 105,027 3,967 108,994 3.64 0.31
TOTAL 14,604,925 579,160 15,184,085 3.81% -0.13%
Table 23: 2019 House of Representatives elections, breakdown of informal votes by state and territory
State/territory Formal votes Informal votes Total Informal % Swing %
New South Wales 4,537,336 342,051 4,879,387 7.01 0.84
Victoria 3,695,032 180,426 3,875,458 4.66 -0.11
Queensland 2,829,018 147,290 2,976,308 4.95 0.25
Western Australia 1,401,874 80,575 1,482,449 5.44 1.45
South Australia 1,072,648 54,202 1,126,850 4.81 0.63
Tasmania 347,992 15,970 363,962 4.39 0.41
Australian Capital Territory 265,975 9,616 275,591 3.49 0.73
Northern Territory 103,518 5,093 108,611 4.69 -2.66
TOTAL 14,253,393 835,223 15,088,616 5.54% 0.49%

By-elections voting data

Table 24: By-elections conducted during 2018–19
By–election Polling day Result declared No. of candidates Former member Elected member
Braddon Saturday
28 July 2018
Wednesday 1 August 2018 8 Justine Keay Justine Keay
Fremantle Saturday
28 July 2018
Wednesday 1 August 2018 7 Josh Wilson Josh Wilson
Longman Saturday
28 July 2018
Saturday 11 August 2018 11 Susan Lamb Susan Lamb
Mayo Saturday
28 July 2018
Wednesday 1 August 2018 7 Rebekha Sharkie Rebekha Sharkie
Perth Saturday
28 July 2018
Saturday 11 August 2018 15 Tim Hammond Patrick Gorman
Wentworth Saturday, 20 October 2018 Monday 5 November 2018 16 Malcolm Turnbull Kerryn Phelps
Table 25: Key Voting Data for each by-election 2018–19
Vote type Ordinary Absent Provisional Declaration
pre-poll
Postal Total
Division Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Braddon 74 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 57,127 93.96 0 0.00 113 93.39 745 98.03 4,795 97.76 62,780 94.29
Informal 3,671 6.04 0 0.00 8 6.61 15 1.97 110 2.24 3,804 5.71
Total Votes 60,798 (91.31) 0 (0.00) 121 (0.18) 760 (1.14) 4,905 (7.37) 66,584 (90.38)*
Fremantle 40 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 57,238 92.47 0 0.00 202 92.24 133 99.25 5,670 95.68 63,243 92.76
Informal 4,659 7.53 0 0 17 7.76 1 0.75 256 4.32 4,933 7.24
Total Votes 61,897 (90.79) 0 (0.00) 219 (0.32) 134 (0.20) 5,926 (8.69) 68,176 (66.09)*
Longman 42 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 77,588 93.52 0 0.00 220 92.83 388 97.73 10,172 97.10 88,368 93.93
Informal 5,377 6.48 0 0.00 17 7.17 9 2.27 304 2.90 5,707 6.07
Total Votes 82,965 (88.19%) 0 (0.00%) 237 (0.25%) 397 (0.42%) 10,476 (11.14%) 94,075 (84.26%)*
Mayo 79 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 79,239 96.28 0 0.00 259 96.64 525 98.50 8,706 98.07 88,729 96.47
Informal 3,058 3.72 0 0.00 9 3.36 8 1.50 171 1.93 3,246 3.53
Total Votes 82,297 (89.48%) 0 (0.00%) 268 (0.29%) 533 (0.58%) 8,877 (9.65%) 91,975 (85.52%)*
Perth 46 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 52,725 89.62 0 0.00 273 88.06 159 95.78 4,847 93.48 58,004 89.94
Informal 6,104 10.38 0 0.00 37 11.94 7 4.22 338 6.52 6,486 10.06
Total votes 58,829 (91.22%) 0 (0.00%) 310 (0.48%) 166 (0.26%) 5,185 (8.04%) 64,490 (64.07%)*
Wentworth 43 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)
Formal 66,838 93.75 0 0.00 421 93.35 301 98.37 8,566 95.15 76,126 93.92
Informal 4,456 6.25 0 0.00 30 6.65 5 1.63 437 4.85 4,928 6.08
Total Votes 71,294 (87.96%) 0 (0.00%) 451 (0.56%) 306 (0.38%) 9,003 (11.11%) 81,054 (78.13%)*

*Total percentage figures reflect the turnout (total votes as a percentage of enrolment).

Appendix E: Public awareness data

Advertising and market research

The AEC conducted the Your vote will help shape Australia national advertising campaign in 2018–19 for the 2019 federal election. The AEC also conducted the Stop and consider national social media advertising campaign for the 2019 federal election.

Non-campaign newspaper advertisements supported the conduct of the 2019 federal election, federal redistributions, by-elections and party registration processes.

Table 26 shows payments of $13,800 or more (GST inclusive) to advertising agencies and market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising organisations, as required under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. Figures reflect payments above the threshold unless otherwise specified.

Table 26: Advertising and media placement payments, $13,800 or more
Services Agency name Details Amount ($)
GST inclusive
Advertising creative development BMF Advertising Creation of the Your vote will help shape Australia advertising campaign materials 429,567.15
Cultural Perspectives Creation of the CALD/translated advertising materials for the Your vote will help shape Australia campaign 303,930.00
Cox Inall Ridgeway Creation of both Indigenous/translated radio ad and digital advertising materials for the Your vote will help shape Australia campaign. 45,515.25
Horizon Communication Group Creation of creative concepts and variations for the Stop and consider campaign 105,000
Market research Orima Research Concept testing for the Stop and consider campaign creative and associated material 61,230.04
Wallis Consulting Group Benchmarking and tracking research for the Your vote will help Shape Australia and Stop and consider campaigns 565,393.87
Wallis Consulting Group Conduct of a voter survey—research used for internal planning purposes 37,450.50
Advertising placement Universal McCann * Advertising placement including the 2019 federal election, federal by-elections, industrial and commercial elections, electoral redistributions, party registrations and recruitment 20,435,126.07
TOTAL $21,983,212.88

* Due to the way payments are reported to the AEC, figures from Universal McCann include invoices below the threshold.

Appendix F: Electoral redistribution data

Table 27: Summary of electoral redistributions concluded in 2018–19 *
TIMLINE OF EVENTS
Redistribution activity Victoria Australian
Capital Territory
South Australia
Basis for AEC’s determination that a redistribution is required On 31 August 2017 the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen by Victoria at a general election had increased from 37 to 38 On 31 August 2017 the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen by the Australian Capital Territory at a general election had increased from two to three On 31 August 2017 the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen by South Australia at a general election had decreased from 11 to 10
Augmented Electoral Commission activities Decision announced: during 2017–18 Decision announced: 3 July 2018 Decision announced: during 2017–18
Gazettal of determination of names and boundaries of electoral divisions 13 July 2018 13 July 2018 20 July 2018

* There were no electoral redistributions commenced in 2018–19.

Appendix G: Political party registrations and financial disclosure data

Annual financial disclosure returns and amendments received in 2018–19 include:

  • 653 annual financial disclosure returns and amendments
  • 584 returns and 27 amendments for the 2017–18 financial year
  • six returns and 35 amendments for the 2016–17 financial year
  • one amendment for the 2015–16 financial year
  • 66 by-election returns and two election returns from the 2016 federal election

Funding payments for 2018–19 elections

Table 28: 2018 Braddon by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Liberal Party of Australia 67,392.74
Australian Labor Party 63,490.55
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party 8,159.87
Australian Greens, Tasmanian Branch 6,885.57
Craig Garland – Independent 18,138.20
TOTAL $164,066.93
Table 29: 2018 Fremantle by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Australian Labor Party 90,997.29
The Greens (WA) Inc. 28,592.35
Liberal Democratic Party 24,381.16
Australian Christians 9,160.71
Animal Justice Party 9,015.78
Jason Spanbroek – Independent 8,857.18
TOTAL $171,004.47
Table 30: 2018 Longman by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Australian Labor Party 96,264.01
Liberal Party of Australia 71,562.91
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 38,450.37
Queensland Greens 11,660.08
TOTAL $217,937.37
Table 31: 2018 Mayo by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Centre Alliance 107,656.11
Liberal Party of Australia 90,838.68
Australian Greens (South Australia) 21,597.40
Australian Labor Party 14,684.48
TOTAL $234,776.67
Table 32: 2018 Perth by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Australian Labor Party 62,380.33
The Greens (WA) Inc 29,828.36
Liberal Democratic Party 10,610.02
Paul Collins – Independent 15,083.72
Julie Matheson – Independent 8,539.97
James Grayden – Independent 7,014.10
TOTAL $133,456.50
Table 33: 2018 Wentworth by-election payment to political parties and candidates
Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Liberal Party of Australia 89,679.24
Kerryn Phelps – Independent 60,758.74
Australian Labor Party 24,001.06
The Greens NSW 17,892.10
TOTAL $192,331.14
Table 34: 2019 federal election automatic payments to political parties and independent candidates

The Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Act 2018 (FAD Reform Act) introduced changes to the way election funding is paid. These changes first applied to the federal election held on 18 May 2019. Election funding entitlements are calculated as at the 20th day after polling day and an automatic payment is paid to eligible candidates and political parties as soon as practicable after that day. For the federal election, the 20th day after polling day was Friday 7 June 2019 and the automatic payment amount was $10,080.

To receive election funding greater than the automatic payment, the agent of the eligible political party, candidate or Senate group must lodge a claim with the AEC setting out the electoral expenditure incurred.

Election funding claims for the 2019 federal election can be lodged from 7 June to 17 November 2019. Details of the amounts paid are published on the Transparency Register as claims are determined.

The following table lists the political parties and candidates that received the automatic payment.

Political party/candidate Amount ($)
Animal Justice Party 10,080
Australia First Party (NSW) 10,080
Australian Greens 10,080
Australian Labor Party (ALP) 10,080
Centre Alliance 10,080
Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group) 10,080
Country Liberals (Northern Territory) 10,080
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party 10,080
Jacqui Lambie Network 10,080
Katter's Australian Party (KAP) 10,080
Liberal Democratic Party 10,080
Liberal Party of Australia 10,080
National Party of Australia – NSW 10,080
National Party of Australia – Victoria 10,080
National Party of Australia (WA) 10,080
Pauline Hanson's One Nation 10,080
Queensland Greens 10,080
Reason Australia 10,080
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party 10,080
The Australian Greens – Victoria 10,080
The Greens (WA) 10,080
The Greens NSW 10,080
United Australia Party 10,080
Victorian Socialists 10,080
Julia Banks 10,080
Jarrod Bingham 10,080
Adam Blakester 10,080
Andrew Bock 10,080
Tim Bohm 10,080
Craig Brakey 10,080
Arthur Chesterfield-Evans 10,080
Jamie Christie 10,080
Damien Cole 10,080
Alex Dyson 10,080
Sue Fraser-Adams 10,080
Helen Haines 10,080
Nathan Herbert 10,080
Tim Jerome 10,080
Simone Karandrews 10,080
Huw Kingston 10,080
Ray Kingston 10,080
Will Landers 10,080
Innes Larkin 10,080
Fiona Leviny 10,080
Hamish MacFarlane 10,080
Kevin Mack 10,080
Jeremy Miller 10,080
Jason Modica 10,080
Robert Oakeshott 10,080
Kerryn Phelps 10,080
Grant Schultz 10,080
Zali Steggall 10,080
Louise Stewart 10,080
Alice Thompson 10,080
Van Tran 10,080
Andrew Wilkie 10,080
Oliver Yates 10,080
Senate Group – Anthony Pesec and Gary Kent 10,080
TOTAL $584,640
Table 35: Party registration related applications and requests 2018–19
Application/requests Approved
Register a new political party 14
Voluntarily deregister a political party 3
Political party deregistered by a delegate of the Electoral Commission
Change party details (including name, abbreviation and logo) 9
Update party office holder information – change registered officer 12
Update party office holder information – change other party officials 105

Appendix H: Workforce statistics

Table 36: All ongoing employees by location—current report period (2018–19)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
NSW 35 2 37 79 34 113 150
Qld 20 2 22 65 10 75 97
SA 10 10 19 6 25 35
Tas 3 3 11 2 13 16
Vic 29 2 31 66 19 85 116
WA 6 6 36 12 48 54
ACT 103 5 108 135 26 161 269
NT 1 1 1
TOTAL 207 11 218 411 109 520 738
Table 37: All non-ongoing employees by location—current report period (2018–19)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
NSW 2 2 7 6 13 15
Qld 7 7 5 5 10 17
SA 1 1 5 5 6
Tas 2 2 2
Vic 2 2 4 3 12 15 19
WA 1 1 4 1 5 6
ACT 15 1 16 14 2 16 32
NT 2 2 3 3 5
TOTAL 30 3 33 43 26 69 102
Table 38: All ongoing employees by location—previous report period (2017–18)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
NSW 39 2 41 79 40 119 160
Qld 20 20 59 22 81 101
SA 7 7 21 1 22 29
Tas 5 5 12 2 14 19
Vic 25 2 27 66 27 93 120
WA 9 9 39 10 49 58
ACT 105 8 113 128 25 153 266
NT 2 2 2 2 4
TOTAL 212 12 224 406 127 533 757
Table 39: All non-ongoing employees by location—previous report period (2017–18)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
NSW 1 1 1
Qld 4 1 5 2 2 7
SA 3 1 4 3 3 6 10
Tas 2 2 2
Vic 2 1 3 3
WA 2 2 2 2 4
ACT 10 2 12 16 2 18 30
TOTAL 19 4 23 27 7 34 57
Table 40: APS Act* ongoing employees by classification—current report period (2018–19)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
SES 2 2 2 2
SES 1 3 3 5 5 8
EL 2 16 16 26 1 27 43
EL 1 53 53 53 5 58 111
APS 6 85 3 88 143 10 153 241
APS 5 14 1 15 36 36 51
APS 4 13 13 50 11 61 74
APS 3 20 20 89 3 92 112
APS 2 1 7 8 9 79 88 96
TOTAL 207 11 218 411 109 520 738

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 41: APS Act* non-ongoing employees by classification—current report period (2018–19)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
SES 1 1 1 1
EL 2 3 3 3
EL 1 3 3 2 2 5
APS 6 10 10 7 7 17
APS 5 7 7 6 6 13
APS 4 3 3 10 1 11 14
APS 3 3 3 5 5 8
APS 2 1 3 4 12 25 37 41
TOTAL 30 3 33 43 26 69 102

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 42: APS Act* ongoing employees by classification—previous report period (2017–18)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
SES 2 2 2 2
SES 1 4 4 5 5 9
EL 2 14 1 15 25 25 40
EL 1 50 2 52 60 8 68 120
APS 6 69 2 71 114 10 124 195
APS 5 36 36 56 2 58 94
APS 4 14 2 16 40 11 51 67
APS 3 21 21 84 13 97 118
APS 2 2 5 7 22 83 105 112
TOTAL 212 12 224 406 127 533 757

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 43: APS Act* non-ongoing employees by classification—previous report period (2017–18)
  Male Female Total
  Full
Time
Part Time Total Male Full
Time
Part Time Total Female  
EL 2 1 1 1 1 2
EL 1 4 4 4 4 8
APS 6 3 2 5 4 1 5 10
APS 5 5 1 6 4 1 5 11
APS 4 6 1 7 7
APS 3 5 5 7 7 12
APS 2 1 1 2 1 4 5 7
TOTAL 19 4 23 27 7 34 57

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 44: APS Act* ongoing employees by classification—current report period (2018–19)
  Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total
NSW 150 15 165
Qld 97 17 114
SA 35 6 41
Tas 16 2 18
Vic 116 19 135
WA 54 6 60
ACT 269 32 301
NT 1 5 6
TOTAL 738 102 840

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 45: APS Act* employment type (ongoing or non-ongoing) by location—previous report period (2017–18)
  Ongoing Non-Ongoing Total
NSW 160 1 161
Qld 101 7 108
SA 29 10 39
Tas 19 2 21
Vic 120 3 123
WA 58 4 62
ACT 266 30 296
NT 4 4
TOTAL 757 57 814

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Indigenous employment

Table 46: APS Act* Indigenous employment—current report period (2018–19)
  Total
Ongoing 12
Non-ongoing 2
TOTAL 14

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 47: APS Act* Indigenous employment—previous report period (2017–18)
  Total
Ongoing 13
Non-ongoing 2
TOTAL 15

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Employment arrangements and salaries

Table 48: APS Act* employment arrangements—current report period (2018–19)
  SES Non-SES Total
EA 3 2243 2246
S24 8 8
TOTAL 11 2243 2254

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Table 49: APS Act* employment salary ranges by classification level—current report period (2018–19)
  Minimum salary ($) Maximum salary ($)
SES 2 269,662 275,909
SES 1 188,977 226,806
EL 2 118,493 218,581
EL 1 100,225 124,240
APS 6 80,255 96,655
APS 5 72,501 79,455
APS 4 65,004 71,233
APS 3 58,322 63,915
APS 2 51,203 56,782
APS 1 45,243 50,006

* Australian Public Service Act 1999.

Statutory appointments

Table 50: Statutory appointments under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 as of 30 June 2019
Position Legislative provision for existence of role Current occupant Current term
Electoral Commissioner Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 18(1) of the Electoral Act Tom Rogers Five years from 15/12/2014
Deputy Electoral Commissioner Subsection 19(1) of the Electoral Act Jeff Pope APM Five years from 19/12/2016
Australian Electoral Officer NSW Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Warwick Austin Five years from 02/11/2017
Australian Electoral Officer Vic Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Steve Kennedy Five years from 15/06/2017
Australian Electoral Officer Qld Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Thomas Ryan Five years from 03/09/2015
Australian Electoral Officer WA Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Fleur Hill Five years from 23/03/2017
Australian Electoral Officer SA Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Martyn Hagan Five years from 8/12/2016
Australian Electoral Officer Tas Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act David Molnar Five years from 8/12/2016
Australian Electoral Officer NT Subsection 20(1) of the Electoral Act Vacant* Vacant. Term not to exceed seven years
Chairperson Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 6(2)(a) of the Electoral Act The Hon.
Dennis Cowdroy OAM QC
Five years from 23/03/2015
Non-judicial member Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 6(2)(c) of the Electoral Act David Kalisch Five years from 30/04/2015

* These duties are being performed by Geoff Bloom in an acting capacity.

Key management remuneration

Table 51: Information about remuneration for key management personnel—current report period (2018–19)
Executive Remuneration Reporting (KMP)   Short-term benefits Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination Benefits Total remuneration
Name Position title Base
salary
($)
Bonuses
($)
Other benefits and allowances ($) Superannuation contributions ($) Long service leave ($) Other long-term benefits ($)
Tom Rogers Electoral Commissioner 509,423 71,182 11,913 592,518
Jeff Pope Deputy Electoral Commissioner 314,031 42,723 7,286 364,040
Andrew Gately First Assistant Commissioner 278,796 50,043 6,599 335,438
Tim Courtney First Assistant Commissioner 265,284 51,575 6,635 323,494
TOTAL 1,367,534 215,523 32,434 1,615,491

* Due to the calculation methodology, figures in this table may not agree to those published for Statutory Appointments by the Remuneration Tribunal.

Table 52: Information about remuneration for senior executives—current report period (2018–19)
  Short-term benefits Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration
Remuneration band ($) Number of senior executives Average base salary ($) Average bonuses ($) Average other benefits and allowances ($) Average superannuation contributions ($) Average long service leave ($) Average other long-term benefits ($) Average termination benefits ($) Average total remuneration ($)
0–220,000 6 115,267 20,740 6,778 9,565 152,350
220,001–245,000 4 190,327 31,460 9,024 230,811
245,001–270,000 3 206,689 37,549 13,584 257,823
270,001–295,000 4 243,187 34,129 6,687 284,002
Table 53: Information about remuneration for other highly paid staff—current report period (2018–19)
  Short-term benefits Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination benefits Total remuneration
Remuneration band Number of senior executives Average base salary ($) Average bonuses ($) Average other benefits and allowances ($) Average superannuation contributions ($) Average long service leave ($) Average other long-term benefits ($) Average termination benefits ($) Average total remuneration ($)
245,001–270,000 1 219,597 33,296 5,331 258,224