Annual Report 2013–14

Report on performance

Election support

The AEC contributes to democracy at home and abroad by delivering a range of election support services. These include support to Australian workplaces, members of parliament, political parties and candidates, as well as state, territory and overseas electoral authorities.

Overview

This second part of the report on performance for Programme 1.2 describes AEC performance in:

  • maintaining the Register of Political Parties
  • supporting transparency in political funding
  • supporting Australian workplaces to hold free and fair elections
  • providing assistance to other electoral authorities.

2013–14 performance highlights include:

  • delivery of party registration services to support the conduct of the 2013 federal election
  • more than 2 500 financial disclosure returns processed, including 1 726 returns for the 2013 federal election
  • a total of $60 957 049.70 in election funding paid to registered political parties and candidates
  • a specialist Funding and Disclosure branch established and a revised model for risk management of compliance implemented
  • conducting 1 027 workplace elections and ballots, 167 fee-for-service elections, 578 protected action ballots and 282 industrial elections
  • provision of assistance to state, territory and local governments, including extracts from the electoral roll for the conduct of elections and management of more than 70 state and territory roll closes
  • provision of assistance to Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, Nepal and other international partners.

Maintaining the Register of Political Parties

The AEC maintains the Register of Political Parties as required under Part XI of the Electoral Act and helps political parties to understand how to apply for and maintain registration.

Political parties are not obliged to register with the AEC. For those that register there are benefits and obligations. These are outlined in the AEC Party Registration Guide which is available on the AEC website.

In 2013–14 the AEC:

  • received and processed applications and liaised with parties to update details
  • maintained the Register of Party Agents
  • updated contact details for party officials (party secretaries, registered officers, deputy registered officers and party agents).

In 2013–14 the AEC received five applications to register a political party and no applications to deregister a political party. These numbers are significantly lower than those for 2012–13 and are in keeping with the historical pattern of increased registrations in the year before a federal election and a decrease in the year the election is held.

The AEC also received five applications to change a party name and/or abbreviation – this number is much higher than usual. However, this is in line with the increase in applications for registration received ahead of the 2013 federal election.

For the 2013 federal election, the 2014 Griffith by-election and the 2014 Western Australian Senate election, signatures of registered officers and deputy registered officers of all parties were made available to AEC returning officers who received nominations around Australia. Checking signatures is an important step in validating nominations before an election.

Requests for review of party registration decisions

Section 141 of the Electoral Act provides for a review of certain party registration decisions made by the Electoral Commissioner or the Commissioner’s delegate.

In 2013–14 the AEC received six applications for review of a delegate’s decision and determined two applications received in June 2013. These requests for review comprised:

  • two concerning refusals to register new political parties
  • two concerning the registration of parties
  • one concerning the approval to register the abbreviation of a party
  • three concerning refusals to change a registered officer.

The three-person Australian Electoral Commission affirmed the delegate’s decision in each case. Further details are available on the AEC website.

Applications to update party office holder information

The AEC contacts parties through the year to ask them to check records held by the AEC concerning party officers. Up-to-date details for parties are critical in an election year.

In 2013–14 the AEC received 29 applications to change the details of the registered officer of a party and 114 applications to change details of other party officials (deputy registered officers, party agents and party secretaries). These numbers reflect a continuation of the increased activity seen in 2012–13 in the lead-up to the 2013 federal election.

The AEC provides updated party registration information on its website including:

  • the current Register of Political Parties, including registered party names, optional abbreviations, registered officer details and whether the party wishes to receive election funding
  • publishing notices on party registration required under the Electoral Act
  • historical information
  • the AEC’s Party Registration Guide
  • statements of reasons for decisions on particular applications
  • forms and explanations to help parties to make applications.

Transparency of political funding

The Commonwealth funding and financial disclosure scheme, established under Part XX of the Electoral Act, deals with the public funding of federal election campaigns and the disclosure of detailed financial information.

The disclosure scheme provides transparency in financial matters by requiring candidates, political parties and their associated entities, donors and other participants in the electoral process to lodge annual or election period financial disclosure returns with the AEC.

2013–14 financial disclosure returns

During 2013–14, the AEC received 709 annual financial disclosure returns. This includes 681 returns for 2012–13, five returns and 10 amendments for 2011–12 and five returns and eight amendments relating to returns for previous financial years. The AEC also received 1 726 election financial disclosure returns for the 2013 federal election. They consisted of 1 707 candidate returns, 10 Senate group returns and nine election donor returns.

The AEC also received 11 candidate returns for the 2014 Griffith by-election and 77 candidate returns and one Senate group return for the WA Senate election held on 5 April 2014. Table 12 shows details of financial disclosure returns lodged and published from 2010–13. Information on all election returns is available on the AEC website.

Political party and associated entity returns for 2013–14 are due on 20 October 2014. Donor and third party returns for 2013–14 are due on 17 November 2014. These returns will be published to the AEC website on the first working day in February 2015. Table 12 shows the number of returns lodged for the three previous financial years.

Online lodgement of returns is available through the AEC’s eReturns system, which is a secure portal on the AEC website. The uptake of online lodgement has continued to increase. This year, 62 per cent of returns were completed online compared with 56 per cent in 2012–13 and 47 per cent in 2011–12.

Compliance reviews and special investigations

The AEC undertakes compliance reviews of disclosure returns lodged by political parties and associated entities under section 316(2A) of the Electoral Act. These are undertaken over the three-year life of the federal parliament. In 2013–14, the AEC completed 39 compliance reviews of disclosure returns lodged by political parties and associated entities.

Review of funding and disclosure functions

In January 2014 the AEC established an independent Funding and Disclosure branch to drive ongoing implementation of recommendations made by Mr Ron McLeod AM, who conducted an independent review of AEC administration of funding and disclosure services in late 2012. Mr McLeod’s report, Review of the Australian Electoral Commission’s disclosure compliance function under Part XX of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, made four key recommendations:

  • expand the AEC’s programme of compliance reviews based on a broader use of existing powers under the Electoral Act
  • adopt a new business model for the AEC’s compliance function
  • establish a new risk-based AEC branch to administer the funding, disclosure and compliance schemes
  • further develop and integrate the funding and disclosure IT system.

The AEC accepted all recommendations.

The new Funding and Disclosure branch has adopted a revised business model that includes a strengthened, risk-based approach to identifying returns to be reviewed. In line with strengthened integrity measures across all AEC programmes, the new model will provide greater transparency and assurance to stakeholders that AEC compliance functions meet legislative requirements, are cost-effective and are achieving desired regulatory outcomes.

Election funding

The AEC paid total election funding of $60 957 049.70 to registered political parties and candidates during 2013–14. This included $58 076 456.01 paid following the 2013 federal election, $182 378.96 paid following the Griffith by-election and $2 698 214.73 paid following the 2014 WA Senate election.

The AEC calculates the election funding rate for each vote received by candidates and Senate groups who receive at least four per cent of the formal first preference vote in a federal election. Every six months the election funding rate is adjusted in line with the consumer price index. The rates that applied in 2013–14 were:

  • 248.800 cents per first preference vote for 1 July to 31 December 2013
  • 252.781 cents per first preference vote for 1 January to 30 June 2014.

The Act requires that at least 95 per cent of election funding entitlements, calculated on the basis of votes counted as at the 20th day after polling day, be paid as soon as possible. The balance of entitlements must be paid when the counting of votes is finalised.

2013 federal election

For the 7 September 2013 federal election, the AEC approved and processed the initial payments of election funding on 27 September 2013 based on the vote count at the 20th day after polling day. A payment of 99 per cent of the entitlement was made to all parties and independent candidates with the precondition that a minimum of $200 was withheld until the count was finalised.

Of a total of $58 076 456.01 in election funding, $56 367 240.38 was paid in the initial payments and $1 709 215.63 was paid at the completion of the vote count. Table 13 shows the breakdown of funding paid.

2013 Western Australian Senate recount – compensation paid following the loss of votes

As a result of the loss of ballot papers during the 2013 Western Australian Senate recount, the AEC obtained approval from the Special Minister of State, Senator the Hon Michael Ronaldson, to make payments in lieu of election funding entitlements that would otherwise have accrued. These payments are authorised under the Scheme for Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration.

Based on the original count, 1 162 ballot papers would have been included in the calculation of election funding entitlements. Accordingly, a total of $2 891.06 in additional payments was distributed as shown in Table 14.

The Special Minister of State also approved the reimbursement of nomination deposits1 to those 2013 WA Senate groups and candidates who had not already had their deposit returned. These payments were made before the close of nominations for the 2014 WA Senate election.

Griffith by-election

Counting in the Griffith by-election, held on 8 February 2014, was complete by Friday, 28 February 2014, the 20th day after polling. This allowed the AEC to calculate and pay the total funding entitlements in a single round of payments. The total election funding paid for the Griffith by-election was $182 378.96. Table 15 shows the breakdown of payments.

2014 Western Australian Senate election

For the 2014 WA Senate election, the AEC calculated the initial payments of election funding on 25 April 2014. Payments were made at 99 per cent of the entitlement as at the 20th day after polling day. Of a total of $2 698 214.73 in election funding, $2 671 177.54 was paid in the initial payments and $27 037.19 was paid on the completion of the vote count. The breakdown of payments is shown in Table 16.

Support for Australian workplaces

Under the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009, the AEC conducts elections for office in registered organisations. This includes all elections and amalgamation ballots for trade unions and employer organisations registered under the Act. The AEC also conducts protected action ballots under the Fair Work Act and provides fee-for-service elections at full cost recovery.

In 2013–14, the AEC conducted 1 027 workplace elections and ballots. These included industrial elections, protected action ballots and fee-for-service elections. All were delivered successfully and on time. Table 17 provides a breakdown.

Industrial elections

In 2013–14 the AEC conducted 282 industrial elections to fill offices in employee (union) and employer organisations registered under the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act. In accordance with this Act, all elections were secret ballots conducted in line with the voting system specified in the registered rules of each organisation. Postal voting was the most common voting method. After each election the AEC reported to the Fair Work Commission and the organisations involved, including feedback on any difficult-to-interpret rules.

Protected action ballots

Under the Fair Work Act, protected action ballots allow working Australians to choose, by secret ballot, whether they agree with proposed industrial action such as strikes, bans or work stoppages. Protected action ballots occur during negotiations for an enterprise agreement when a bargaining representative for an employee lodges a ballot request with the Fair Work Commission. The Commission appoints the AEC to conduct these ballots.

In 2013–14 the AEC conducted 578 protected action ballots for employees from organisations across many industries. Ballots were by post or at worksites and usually took about three weeks to complete. After each ballot, the AEC provided the results to the Fair Work Commission, the bargaining representative for the employee, and the organisation. Where complaints were made or irregularities occurred during the course of the ballot, the necessary post-ballot reports were sent to the Fair Work Commission.

Fee-for-service elections

In 2013–14 the AEC delivered 167 fee-for-service elections and ballots for public and private sector organisations. Of a total 167 elections:

  • 130 were enterprise agreement ballots
  • 31 were elections to office
  • 6 were yes/no ballots.

More than 60 per cent of the fee-for-service elections and ballots were for repeat clients, suggesting a high level of satisfaction with the services provided.

In 2013–14 the AEC received 103 enquiries about its paid services via its fee-for-service page on the AEC website. Thirty-six per cent of these enquiries resulted in the AEC conducting the relevant elections or ballots.

The AEC predominantly conducted enterprise agreement ballots for organisations in the manufacturing, retail, energy, transport and mining sectors.

Assistance to state, territory and overseas electoral authorities

The AEC maintains cooperative working relationships with other Australian electoral authorities and provides them with a range of services – including roll maintenance, staffing, facilities and resources – to support state, territory and local government elections.

The AEC also delivers electoral support to other countries through programmes and partnerships that support global democracy, electoral administration and governance.

Collaboration with the Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand

The Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand (ECANZ) is a consultative council of electoral commissioners from the electoral management bodies of Australia and New Zealand. The AEC chairs and provides secretariat services. Activities in 2013–14 included:

  • detailed reporting of the state of the roll and enrolment activities, including close of rolls outcomes
  • maintenance and review of a comprehensive list of equipment available for sharing between jurisdictions
  • a research paper on internet voting as a starting point for discussion among members.

At 30 June 2014, ECANZ members were:

  • Tom Rogers, Acting Australian Electoral Commissioner, Chair
  • Colin Barry, Electoral Commissioner, New South Wales
  • Warwick Gately, Electoral Commissioner, Victoria
  • Walter van der Merwe, Electoral Commissioner, Queensland
  • Chris Avent, Acting Electoral Commissioner, Western Australia
  • Kay Mousley, Electoral Commissioner, South Australia
  • Julian Type, Electoral Commissioner, Tasmania
  • Phil Green, Electoral Commissioner, Australian Capital Territory
  • Iain Loganathan, Electoral Commissioner, Northern Territory
  • Robert Peden, Chief Electoral Officer, New Zealand Electoral Commission.

Support for state, territory and local governments

The AEC has joint roll arrangements with the state and territory electoral commissions and in most cases maintains the state and territory electoral rolls on their behalf. This means voters only need to enrol once to be eligible to vote at federal, state/territory and local elections.

Under joint roll arrangements, the AEC provides extracts from the roll to state and territory electoral bodies, including special roll extracts for the conduct of their elections. In 2013–14 the AEC supported state and territory electoral authorities by providing 745 general roll products and 81 extracts for state, territory and local elections. Table 18 provides further details.

From time to time, the AEC also provides logistical support for state, territory and local government elections, including staff to assist with election tasks. Support provided in 2013–14 includes:

  • roll management support for the 2014 South Australian state election
  • statistical reviews of enrolment trends for the Electoral Commission South Australia (ECSA) and support for the South Australian local government electoral boundary redistribution
  • roll management services for the 2014 Tasmanian House of Assembly elections and for Legislative Council elections in the Divisions of Huon and Rosevears, as well as provision of all returning officers and support staff for the conduct of nominations, voting and counting.

Assisting state, territory and local government electoral bodies provides more information on the range of services provided for each state and territory throughout the year.

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections

The Torres Strait Regional Authority is an Australian Government authority. Its governing board consists of at least 20 elected members living in the Torres Strait region and board elections take place once every four years.

The AEC delivers a range of products and services to support the conduct of these elections in line with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005. There was no board election in 2013–14. The next election is due in 2016.

Advice and assistance in overseas elections

The AEC undertakes international electoral work in accordance with section 7(1)(fa) of the Electoral Act, in close cooperation with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).

The majority of funding for the AEC’s international work is provided by DFAT, but the AEC also works closely with other providers of international electoral assistance, including:

  • International Foundation for Electoral Systems
  • United Nations Electoral Assistance Division
  • United Nations Development Programme
  • International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance
  • Commonwealth Secretariat – an intergovernmental organisation of which Australia is a member.

The AEC actively pursues networking with these bodies and with counterparts in the Asian, Pacific and Southern African regions, particularly through the Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand Electoral Administrators network (PIANZEA).

Asia-Pacific

In 2013–14 the AEC provided secretariat services to PIANZEA and conducted DFAT funded electoral support programmes in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Timor-Leste, Nepal, Bhutan and a number of Pacific Island countries.

Indonesia

The AEC worked with Indonesia’s three election management bodies – the General Elections Commission (KPU), the Elections Supervisory Board (Bawaslu) and the Indonesian Elections Ethics Council (DKPP) – and with academics and local organisations to strengthen electoral capacity and improve regional democracy and governance. The AEC’s Indonesia strategy addresses:

  • exchange of knowledge and experiences related to the study, reform and management of election administration systems
  • education and capacity development programmes on election management and administration
  • research programmes to support election management and administration.

The AEC delivers support through its Jakarta office, which has a permanent in-country director and eight locally engaged staff. In 2013–14 it delivered DFAT funded programmes throughout Indonesia at the national and provincial levels.

Activities included:

  • a research paper on the establishment of a postgraduate-level electoral management course for Indonesian electoral management body officials and possibly other stakeholders
  • an induction programme for newly elected provincial KPU commissioners (104 commissioners from 17 Indonesian provinces)
  • an Indonesian visitor study programme during the 2013 federal election
  • four new instructional manuals for the 2014 Indonesian legislative election
  • monitoring and evaluation of the BRIDGE2 Indonesia programme and creation of a BRIDGE case study
  • a regional knowledge exchange workshop and seminar on increasing election participation between Australia, Indonesia, Thailand and India
  • hosting a multilateral electoral research forum, ‘Towards Election Inclusiveness’, that included election management bodies, academics and research organisations from Australia, Bhutan, Nepal, Timor-Leste, Thailand, South Korea, Mexico, Japan, the Netherlands, Canada and Indonesia.

AEC Indonesia directly trained 225 Indonesian public service officials and 405 non public servants.

Timor-Leste

The AEC worked with the election management bodies in Timor-Leste, the Secretáriado Técnico de Administração Eleitoral (STAE) and the Comissão Nacional de Eleições (CNE), to continue to strengthen electoral capacity.

In September 2013, at the time of the federal election, the AEC delivered an election study programme and a BRIDGE workshop in Darwin for STAE and CNE staff. Additional activities included:

  • an ongoing mentoring and coaching programme for STAE and CNE staff in the field, led by the AEC’s Timor-Leste programme officer
  • delivery of two modified BRIDGE civics education and voter information modules in Dili in February 2013 and two modified BRIDGE introductory modules in Dili in June 2013
  • accreditation of more BRIDGE facilitators in both STAE and CNE.

Papua New Guinea

The AEC works with the Papua New Guinea Electoral Commission (PNGEC) through the AEC PNGEC Twinning Programme, funded by DFAT until the end of 2015. This programme became the only provider of Australian electoral assistance to Papua New Guinea when the broader Australian Government electoral support programme ended in late 2013. Under the programme, the AEC provides short-term injections of technical expertise appropriate to the PNGEC’s focus.

Assistance in 2013–14 included:

  • two staff seconded to assist the PNGEC with a series of enrolment and electoral pilots
  • additional short-term expertise from three staff in the areas of community engagement, training and evaluation to assist with the pilots
  • attendance of seven assistant election managers from Papua New Guinea at AEC-led election study programmes for the March 2014 South Australian and Tasmanian state elections
  • attendance at electoral support programme board meetings.
‘Helping to building the technical capacity of our PNG counterparts was the most rewarding part of the role for me.’

— Sukanthan Aravindan, AEC officer seconded to PNGEC

Nepal

In 2012–13 the AEC assisted the Election Commission of Nepal with ongoing operation of the Nepalese Electoral Education and Information Centre in Kathmandu. Two Election Commission of Nepal staff attended the AEC’s election visitor programme.

As a partner organisation to the Nepalese Electoral Education and Information Centre, the AEC provided pre-deployment briefings, ongoing support and mentoring to two Australian youth ambassadors for development who were working at the centre in 2013–14.

Pacific Islands

In 2013–14 the AEC continued to provide secretariat services to the PIANZEA network. The AEC also provided support to Pacific nations through PIANZEA as well as assistance through other Pacific Island programmes. Activities included:

  • providing a learning clinic for 17 Pacific electoral officials on the AEC’s generic voter registration system, software and hardware and ongoing technical support for users
  • hosting Pacific Island officials as part of the Australian federal election visitor programme in September 2013
  • organising and delivering PIANZEA advisory group meetings held in July 2013 and March 2014
  • delivering BRIDGE civic education and gender modules for 33 electoral officials from the PIANZEA network, including participants from Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Vanuatu, the Cook Islands, Kiribati, the Federated States of Micronesia, Tonga, Timor-Leste and the Marshall Islands
  • supporting the Tongan Electoral Commission by developing a voter education curriculum; training trainers; and supporting election planning, logistics and voter registration
  • delivering a final voter education workshop for district registration officers and staff from the Vanuatu Electoral Office
  • supporting a PIANZEA knowledge exchange on voter education and communication through work placement of a staff member from the Papua New Guinea Electoral Commission with the Solomon Islands Electoral Commission.
‘A great experience provided by AEC. Helps all electoral management bodies and takes forward mutual cooperation to a higher level. [The AEC] deserves thanks for the initiative. It was professional, warm, very hospitable and most productive – worth emulating.’

— Federal election international study programme participant

Other international partnerships and programmes

Hosting international visitors

In 2013–14 the AEC hosted international study programmes and delegations from African and Asia-Pacific countries including Botswana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Myanmar, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, South Sudan, Tonga, Rwanda, Uganda, Ukraine, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Federal election international study programme

The AEC conducted an international study programme during the 2013 federal election. The programme hosted a diverse group of international participants from 19 countries: Bhutan, Canada, Fiji, India, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Timor-Leste, Thailand and Tokelau.

Representatives from the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, the International Foundation for Electoral Systems and DFAT also attended. Such programmes offer participants a range of benefits, including important networking opportunities, and extend the ties that bind the electoral family around the world.

Programme 1.2 Election Support Services – key performance results 2013–14
  2011–12 2012–13 2013–14

Register of Political Parties

Party registration processed in accordance with the legislation and the Register of Political Parties updated in a timely manner.

Achieved

Met requirements of the Electoral Act; all applications received were processed.

Party Registration Guide and related forms updated on the AEC website.

Reasons for AEC decisions about party registration applications published on the AEC website.

Achieved

Met requirements of the Electoral Act.

Received and processed unusually large numbers of applications to register new political parties (33).

Party Registration Guide and related forms updated on AEC website.

Reasons for AEC decisions about party registration applications published on the AEC website.

Achieved

Processed all applications in accordance with the provisions of the Electoral Act and in a timely manner.

Formed a new Funding and Disclosure branch in January 2014, which is responsible for party registration functions in response to 2012 McLeod Inquiry recommendations.a

Funding and disclosure

Election funding calculated and paid in accordance with the legislation.

Not applicable

No federal elections.

Not applicable

No federal elections.

Achieved

See above for details of payments for each event.

Financial disclosures obtained and placed on the public record in accordance with legislated timeframes.

Achieved

Reminded all relevant individuals and organisations to lodge financial disclosure returns and published returns on AEC website as soon as practicable after lodgement.

Prosecuted a candidate from 2010 federal election who failed to lodge a financial disclosure return despite reminders: court found the candidate guilty.

Referred a further three donors to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions (CDPP) for non-lodgement of a 2010–11 annual return.

Achieved

2011–12 annual returns received and processed in time for publication on 1 February 2013.

Received all 2011–12 annual returns, so no prosecutions necessary.

Achieved

Received and processed 681 out of 682 annual returns expected for 2012–13 in time for publication on 3 February 2014.

No cases referred to the CDPP for non-lodgement.

Received and processed 1 726 out of 1 736 candidate and Senate group returns for 2013 federal election.

Referred 10 candidates to CDPP for non-lodgement of a candidate return.

Received all 11 candidates returns for the Griffith by-election.

Industrial elections and protected action ballots

Industrial elections delivered in accordance with relevant legislation.

Achieved

All industrial elections are delivered in accordance with the Fair Work Act and the rules of relevant organisations.

Achieved

All industrial elections are delivered in accordance with the Fair Work Act and the rules of relevant organisations.

Achieved

All industrial elections are delivered in accordance with the Fair Work Act and the rules of relevant organisations.

Protected action ballots delivered in accordance with relevant legislation and Fair Work Commissionb orders.

Achieved

All protected action ballots completed in accordance with the Fair Work Act and Fair Work Australia orders.

Achieved

All protected action ballots completed in accordance with the Fair Work Act and Fair Work Australia orders.

Achieved

All protected action ballots completed in accordance with the Fair Work Act and Fair Work Commission orders.

All election tasks carried out in accordance with legislated timeframes.

Achieved

All industrial election tasks delivered in accordance with legislated timeframes and timetables.

Achieved

All industrial election tasks delivered in accordance with legislated timeframes and timetables.

Achieved

All industrial election tasks delivered in accordance with legislated timeframes and timetables.

Fee-for-service elections

Fee-for-service elections successfully delivered, as required, on a full cost recovery basis.

Achieved

Complied with all relevant legislative requirements, internal policies and organisational rules to conduct fee-for-service elections on a full cost recovery basis.

Achieved

Complied with all relevant legislative requirements and organisational rules to conduct fee-for-service elections on a full cost recovery basis.

Updated relevant internal policies.

Achieved

Complied with all relevant legislative requirements, internal policies and organisational rules to conduct fee-for-service elections on a full cost recovery basis.

Effective assistance is provided with the conduct of state, territory and local government elections where requested by the relevant electoral body.

Achieved

Provided skilled and trained staff and resources to successfully conduct or assist with parliamentary elections.

Provided assistance to state and territory electoral bodies.

Achieved

Continued to provide skilled and trained staff and resources to successfully conduct or assist with parliamentary elections.

Provided assistance to state and territory electoral bodies.

Achieved

Continued to provide skilled and trained staff and resources to successfully conduct or assist with parliamentary elections.

Provided assistance to state and territory electoral bodies.

State, local government stakeholders and fee-for-service clients are fully satisfied with the services provided.

Achieved

Received positive feedback on the conduct of fee-for-service elections from stakeholders and clients.

Achieved

Received positive feedback on the conduct of fee-for-service elections from stakeholders and clients, with 100% of respondents surveyed indicating that they were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with the service provided.

Achieved

Received positive feedback on the conduct of fee-for-service elections; 60% of elections delivered were ‘repeat business’ for previous clients.

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections

Elections delivered in accordance with relevant legislation on a full cost recovery basis.

Not applicable

No elections held.

Achieved

Conducted successful elections on 15 September and 8 December 2012.

Not applicable

No elections held.

Key performance indicator

International assistance by the AEC meets the goals specified for individual projects undertaken, with stakeholders fully satisfied with the services provided.

Achieved

All specified goals met.

Achieved

All specified goals met.

Achieved

All specified goals met.

Feedback from stakeholders on how the AEC met commitments was overwhelmingly positive.

  1. R McLeod 2012, Review of the Australian Electoral Commission’s disclosure compliance function under Part XX of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, PricewaterhouseCoopers.
  2. On 1 January 2013, Fair Work Australia became the Fair Work Commission. The previous name is maintained for the relevant KPI.
  1. Nomination deposits are automatically returned where a candidate or group receives at least four per cent of the first preference votes in the election they contested.
  2. BRIDGE stands for ‘Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections’. The programme provides professional development in election administration and governance.