Investing in our people

Investing in Our People is one of the three enabling themes of our five-year strategic plan. The theme has been translated into a program of goals and activities, split over three phases. Phase three was rolled out in 2011–12.

Our new programs

We delivered three important programs for our staff during 2011–12. These programs addressed concerns raised in our 2009–10 State of the Service Employee Survey. Staff indicated that they were concerned about the lack of opportunities for career progression, the quality of performance management and the standard of decision-making in the AEC.

Rising to Management

The Rising to Management program commenced on 25 October 2011. This program was designed to enhance career progression for APS 1–5 staff in the AEC. It provides a visible and comprehensive investment in the training of staff with management potential.

The program, which runs as a series of residential courses in Sydney over a 10-month period, includes instructor-led sessions on:

  • communication,
  • leadership,
  • ethical decision-making,
  • delegation,
  • managing performance,
  • productive teams,
  • access to qualification in PRINCE2 project management methodology, and
  • practical learning with regard to electoral administration through the delivery of BRIDGE modules.

Staff attend the sessions in Sydney every second month.

We have conducted five residentials so far. Staff will graduate from the first program in August 2012.

The second program commenced in May 2012. Two residentials have been completed to date.

2012 Rising to Management participants

Our 2012 Rising to Management participants.

Back row (left to right): Matthew Tranter, Rick Banfield, Chris McCormack and Cameron Stokes.

Middle row (left to right): David Stuart, Natalie Williams, Kellie Melville, Annette Arton, Jeniffer McGuckin, Lorraine Munro, Anne Tognolini, Emma Warren and Jennifer London.

Front row (left to right): Ann Pitt, Elizabeth West, Louise McCoy, Denise Fernley, Effie Kasavetis, Maryanne Window and Ngaire Edwards.

Ethical Decision Making

In 2011–12, we conducted held 11 facilitator-led sessions of the Ethical Decision Making program, with a total of 211 staff participating around Australia. This program provides a framework for sound decision-making and an introduction to ethics. It was designed to ensure that staff understand the APS Values and Code of Conduct and recognise the importance of making sound decisions by using resources such as the REFLECT model and the Ethics Advisory Service. It was piloted in Queensland in May 2011.

We delivered a modified version of Ethical Decision Making to two international groups in November 2011 and March 2012. The aim was to encourage an understanding of the ethical accountability and transparency that are required when working for the AEC. We will deliver an additional international session of Ethical Decision Making in August 2012.

Managing Performance

In 2011–12, we conducted 11 sessions of the Managing Performance course with a total of 168 staff participating across Australia. The course was designed for staff with supervisory responsibilities to help them to gain a better understanding of, and ability to use, performance management processes in the AEC.

This course is a facilitator-led, one-day program. It addresses such concerns as:

  • the relationship between motivation and employee engagement,
  • managing underperformance – causes and solutions,
  • resolving difficult situations, and
  • the AEC’s Performance Management Program and pathways.

Polling staff development

In 2011–12, we continued to improve electoral training resources for polling staff. We printed election procedures handbooks and workbooks, and developed new online training content tailored to people’s job roles to be ready in time for the next election.

This work commenced in 2010, following the federal election.

We also researched the production of a training video for polling staff. The aim of the video is to improve understanding of the role of polling place officials. We will continue our research and start production in 2012–13.

Recruiting, retaining and staying in contact with staff

Recruiting staff

Throughout 2011–12, our recruitment activities focused on introducing streamlined processes for more efficient recruitment of staff. We achieved quality outcomes more rapidly than in the past, as managers from across several branches established joint selection panels to fill multiple vacancies.

We placed a strong focus on openness and transparency in decision-making, which resulted in a significant increase in the number of staff who used formal selection processes for non-ongoing vacancies.

In our National Office, the number of roles advertised increased from 33 in 2010–11 to 79 in 2011–12.

Our policies and guidelines encouraged managers to open non-ongoing opportunities to merit selection processes where the vacancy exceeded three months.

We also continued our successful graduate program and developed a strategy to improve contact with polling officials between elections.

Advertising of jobs

We significantly reduced our use of print-based advertising over the past year as it was apparent to us that we receive far more job applications from online advertising. Online media reaches a broader audience. This decision has resulted in reduced costs in advertising.

Figure 9 shows the rate of monthly advertising over the past three years. In 2009–10, we advertised a total of 151 vacancies in national, state and divisional offices. In 2010–11, it was 135, and in 2011–12, we advertised 136 vacancies.

Figure 9: Vacancies advertised in 2009–10, 2010–11 and 2011–12

fig 9 - Vacancies advertised in 2009–10, 2010–11 and 2011–12

Graduate recruitment program

We continued to implement our yearly graduate program to strengthen organisational capacity and build leadership potential.

Our graduates undertake three placements across our core business areas and complete a Diploma of Government with the APS Commission. They are encouraged to develop networks across the APS and to work closely with their mentors to best take advantage of the opportunities provided during the program year.

The aim of the program is to build a reserve of high-performing employees who have a well-developed understanding of our broader business objectives.

Our 2011 graduates

2011 was an exciting year of achievement and opportunity for the AEC graduates. Graduates contributed to important and high-profile projects, including a financial review of our organisation and the redistribution of federal electoral boundaries in South Australia.

Of the major projects undertaken for the graduate diploma, one project team was a finalist in the APS Commission’s Outstanding Achievement Award and two project teams were finalists in the Major Project Video Award.

Several graduates travelled interstate to work with state offices, and one graduate participated in our highly regarded BRIDGE training program in the Pacific nation of Palau.

All 13 graduates recruited in 2011 successfully completed the Diploma of Government, and continue to contribute with skill and enthusiasm in a wide variety of roles within the AEC in 2012.

Our 2012 graduates

In 2012, we received 147 applications for our graduate program. Six graduates are now working for us. They have completed their first workplace rotation, and are continuing to learn the mechanics of electoral processes in their second placements.

Major project topics this year involve an investigation of electoral fraud and how to incorporate the important initiatives of the Indigenous Electoral Participation Program into the work of the broader AEC.

Retaining staff

Our staff retention rate for ongoing staff in 2011–12 was 95 per cent, an increase from 89.2 per cent in 2010–11. The retention rate fluctuates between years, generally trending upwards and averaging around 89 per cent over the last eight years.

The AEC’s 2012 graduates (left to right): Stephen Lovell, Igama Mawa, Jen Burgess, Chris Chie, Anu Singh and Nick Ben.

The AEC’s 2012 graduates (left to right): Stephen Lovell, Igama Mawa, Jen Burgess, Chris Chie, Anu Singh and Nick Ben.

Keeping in contact between elections

To maintain a high level of election readiness, we developed a strategy to increase our contact with key polling officials and casual staff between elections. During 2011–12, the strategy focused on refreshing registrations of interest in the AEC employment system, which enables us to:

  • maintain a relationship with our polling officials between electoral events, and
  • develop a current employment database.

We sent emails to people who had registered an email address with us, and asked them to visit the AEC website to request a new password and update their registration of interest online.

For those applicants who did not register with an email address, our divisional office staff contacted them and asked for this information, or sent them a letter along with a copy of their registration of interest for review.

This is the first time that we have used the AEC employment system, which was implemented for the 2010 Federal Election, to maintain a relationship with our past polling officials and casual staff and to develop a current employment database. This work has significantly helped us to streamline the recruitment process and reduce the amount of printed material required.

In 2012–13, we will improve our website by providing better access for applicants and more information regarding employment, training, and changes in legislation that may be of interest to them. We will also request that they maintain their details regularly.

Working for the AEC

Staffing

In 2011–12, we employed 807 ongoing staff and 88 non-ongoing staff. We also employed 1 170 staff for irregular and intermittent duties.

Table 40 and Table 41 provide more detail of our staffing levels in 2011–12, including 2010–11 data for comparison.

Table 40: Ongoing staff employed, including staff on higher duties arrangements, by classification, gender and location, 30 June 2011 and 30 June 2012
Location Classification

Female part time

Female full time

Male part time

Male full time

Total

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

ACT

Electoral Commissioner

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

2

Deputy Electoral Commissioner

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

1

2

SES Band 2

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

1

3

1

SES Band 1

0

0

4

5

0

0

4

4

8

9

Executive Level 2

3

0

12

15

0

0

17

21

32

36

Executive Level 1

6

9

31

31

1

0

32

32

70

72

APS Level 6

4

4

27

33

1

1

22

26

54

64

APS Level 5

3

4

9

15

0

0

15

16

27

35

APS Level 4

10

8

19

21

2

1

13

8

44

38

APS Level 3

1

1

12

0

0

0

5

0

18

1

Graduates

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

4

0

5

APS Level 2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

APS Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

Total

27

26

116

122

4

2

113

115

260

265

NSW

AEO

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

Executive Level 2

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

1

2

2

Executive Level 1

0

0

4

5

0

0

6

7

10

12

APS Level 6

2

1

34

36

0

0

25

21

61

58

APS Level 5

0

0

1

4

0

0

2

2

3

6

APS Level 4

0

0

2

1

0

0

1

0

3

1

APS Level 3

3

4

37

34

0

0

11

11

51

49

APS Level 2

22

14

11

14

3

1

4

6

40

35

Total

27

19

90

95

3

1

51

49

171

164

VIC

AEO

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

2

Executive Level 2

0

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

2

2

Executive Level 1

0

0

5

5

0

0

4

3

9

8

APS Level 6

1

2

17

15

1

0

24

25

43

42

APS Level 5

0

0

2

3

0

0

3

4

5

7

APS Level 4

0

0

2

4

0

1

0

1

2

6

APS Level 3

4

5

26

26

0

0

4

4

34

35

APS Level 2

19

22

11

10

1

1

4

3

35

36

Total

24

29

65

66

2

2

40

41

131

138

QLD

AEO

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Executive Level 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

Executive Level 1

0

0

1

2

0

0

2

2

3

4

APS Level 6

0

0

22

17

0

0

16

14

38

31

APS Level 5

0

0

1

2

0

0

2

4

3

6

APS Level 4

0

0

2

4

0

0

1

1

3

5

APS Level 3

2

3

20

25

0

0

9

5

31

33

APS Level 2

19

10

9

8

0

0

0

1

28

19

Total

21

13

56

58

0

0

31

28

108

99

WA

AEO

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

Executive Level 2

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

3

2

3

APS Level 6

0

0

6

7

0

0

10

10

16

17

APS Level 5

0

0

1

2

0

0

1

1

2

3

APS Level 4

1

2

4

2

0

0

2

0

7

4

APS Level 3

2

1

12

14

0

0

1

1

15

16

APS Level 2

13

13

3

1

0

0

0

0

16

14

Total

16

16

26

26

0

0

18

17

60

59

SA

AEO

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

Executive Level 2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

Executive Level 1

0

0

2

3

0

0

1

0

3

3

APS Level 6

0

0

5

6

0

0

8

6

13

12

APS Level 5

1

0

2

2

0

0

0

1

3

3

APS Level 4

0

0

2

2

1

1

0

1

3

4

APS Level 3

2

2

5

7

0

0

3

2

10

11

APS Level 2

6

6

3

2

0

0

0

0

9

8

APS Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

9

8

21

23

1

1

12

11

43

43

TAS

AEO

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

2

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

1

0

0

2

1

2

2

APS Level 6

0

0

3

3

0

0

2

2

5

5

APS Level 5

0

0

1

1

0

0

3

3

4

4

APS Level 4

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

APS Level 3

2

1

3

5

1

0

0

1

6

7

APS Level 2

3

2

2

2

0

0

0

0

5

4

Total

5

3

10

13

1

0

8

9

24

25

NT

AEO

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

2

APS Level 6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

APS Level 5

0

0

2

4

0

0

1

0

3

4

APS Level 4

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

2

APS Level 3

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

2

APS Level 2

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

2

Total

0

0

3

7

0

0

3

7

6

14

AEC

Total

129

114

387

410

11

6

276

277

803

807

AEO = Australian Electoral Officer, APS = Australian Public Service, SES = Senior Executive Service

Note: Figures include all staff employed at 30 June 2012 under the Public Service Act 1999 and Australian Electoral Officers employed under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. This information is included in the wages and salaries reported in the financial statements.

NSW numbers include staff from ACT divisions.

Source: PayGlobal HR System.

Table 41: Non-ongoing staff employed, including staff on higher duties arrangements, by classification, gender and location, 30 June 2011 and 30 June 2012

Location

Classification

Female part time

Female full time

Male part time

Male full time

Total

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

10–11

11–12

ACT

Executive Level 2

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

2

0

Executive Level 1

2

0

4

5

0

0

1

0

7

5

APS Level 6

0

0

2

3

1

1

0

3

3

7

APS Level 5

0

0

3

0

0

0

1

2

4

2

APS Level 4

4

7

0

4

2

0

2

0

8

11

APS Level 3

1

0

1

0

0

0

2

1

4

1

Graduates

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

APS Level 2

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

1

2

2

APS Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

Total

7

7

11

13

4

1

10

8

32

29

NSW

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

APS Level 6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

APS Level 5

0

0

2

2

0

0

2

0

4

3

APS Level 4

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

APS Level 3

0

0

1

3

0

1

0

1

1

5

APS Level 2

6

3

2

1

0

0

0

0

8

4

Total

6

3

5

7

1

1

2

2

14

13

VIC

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 6

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

APS Level 5

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

2

1

APS Level 4

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

3

APS Level 3

2

0

2

1

3

0

0

0

7

1

APS Level 2

27

12

1

2

0

0

1

0

29

14

Total

29

13

5

4

3

2

2

0

39

19

QLD

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 6

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

APS Level 5

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

2

3

3

APS Level 4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 3

0

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

1

3

APS Level 2

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

2

Total

2

1

3

5

0

0

2

3

7

9

WA

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 6

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

APS Level 5

0

0

2

0

0

0

2

2

4

2

APS Level 4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 3

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

APS Level 2

4

1

1

1

0

0

0

1

5

3

Total

4

1

3

2

0

0

3

4

10

7

SA

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 6

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

APS Level 5

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

2

1

APS Level 4

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

APS Level 3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 2

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

2

1

APS Level 1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Total

0

2

3

2

1

0

1

1

5

5

TAS

APS Level 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

APS Level 2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Total

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2

NT

Executive Level 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APS Level 6

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

APS Level 5

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

1

2

3

APS Level 3

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

APS Level 2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

Total

0

0

4

2

0

0

2

2

6

4

AEC

Total

48

28

34

35

9

4

22

21

113

88

APS = Australian Public Service, SES = Senior Executive Service

Note: Figures include all staff employed at 30 June 2012 under the Public Service Act 1999. This information is included in the wages and salaries reported in the financial statements.

Tasmania had no non-ongoing staff on 30 June 2011.

Source: PayGlobal HR System.

Irregular or intermittent employees

In August 2011, we ceased employing staff under s.35 of the Electoral Act outside an election period, and instead recruited irregular or intermittent employees under s.22(2)(c) of the Public Service Act 1999. This change in employment arrangements provides irregular or intermittent employees with coverage under the AEC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014.

Irregular or intermittent staff are employed at any classification level in the AEC; however, they generally work at the APS 1 level. Specific employee numbers are shown in Table 42.

Table 42: Irregular or intermittent staff by classification
Classification Number of irregular or intermittent staff

APS 1

1 127

APS 2

31

APS 3

2

APS 4

1

APS 5

3

APS 6

2

EL 1

3

EL2

1

Total

1 170

APS = Australian Public Service; EL = Executive Level

APS 1 irregular or intermittent employees undertake general office assistant duties in state and divisional offices, and also perform a range of work at the APS 1 classification level, including attendance at citizenship ceremonies, electoral roll management, providing an election management and support service, and education and communication. Through this work, they build their skills, access training and become a key part of our election workforce. This allows us to supplement our workforce to meet workload demands as they arise.

Employment agreements

In November 2011, staff voted in the AEC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014, following eight months of bargaining. The new agreement creates a better working environment for all staff, particularly in times of peak workload during an election.

The majority of staff are covered by the agreement. The salary ranges for each classification under the agreement are shown in Table 43.

Table 43: AEC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014 salary ranges, by classifications, 30 June 2012
Classification Remuneration band ($)

EL 2

106 288–124 800

EL 1

89 901–101 309

APS 6

71 988–80 684

APS 5

65 032–71 270

APS 4

58 307–63 895

APS 3

52 315–57 330

APS 2

45 928–50 933

APS 1

40 583–44 854

APS = Australian Public Service; EL = Executive Level.

Note: Due to confidentiality, the full span of salary ranges for other instruments could not be provided.

Australian Workplace Agreements

One staff member in our Senior Executive Service was covered by an Australian Workplace Agreement.

Section 24(1) determinations

In 2011–12, the terms and conditions of employment of 22 employees, comprising Senior Executive Service and Executive Level employees, were set by individual determinations under s.24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Individual flexibility arrangements

The AEC Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014 provides an avenue for the Electoral Commissioner to agree to an individual flexibility arrangement with employees, in one or more of the following matters:

  • arrangements about when work is performed
  • overtime rates
  • penalty rates
  • allowances
  • remuneration
  • leave.

The arrangements provide flexibility to meet the genuine needs of the AEC and individual employees, and are agreed to by the Electoral Commissioner and the employee.

During 2011–12, four employees entered into individual flexibility arrangements, allowing payment of allowances specific to their role and/or location.

Performance pay

All salary progression in the AEC continued to be subject to meeting required performance standards governed by the Performance Management Program through individual performance plans, as part of the Investing in Our People program.

We did not offer performance bonuses to any employees during 2011–12.

Senior executive remuneration

Remuneration for the Electoral Commissioner continued to be determined by the Remuneration Tribunal under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973.

Other statutory appointees are part of the Principal Executive Officer structure under that Act, where remuneration and conditions for those appointees are determined by the Electoral Commissioner within parameters set by the Remuneration Tribunal.

Table 44 provides base salary bands for statutory appointees and senior executive staff effective 30 June 2012.

Table 44: Base salary bands for statutory appointees and senior executive staff effective 30 June 2012.
Staff (no.)1 Remuneration band ($)2

4

180 000–299 999

8

140 000–179 999

7

100 000–139 999

0

0–99 999

  1. This data includes staff acting in positions at 30 June 2012.
  2. Bands do not represent total remuneration; they include superannuable salary but do not include other components of salary packaging such as cars and superannuation.

Performance management

Our Performance Management Program, which was successfully implemented in 2010–11, was expanded to include longer-term, non-ongoing staff. This forms part of our 2011–2014 Enterprise Agreement.

Our performance program supports individual performance plans and development plans. It enables senior managers to check, monitor and review the status of their staff’s performance agreements. This provides assurance that all agreements are in place, and scheduled performance reviews are undertaken.

During 2012, we delivered a ‘Managing Performance’ workshop across all states and territories to assist supervisors to develop their expertise in performance management. The workshop was facilitated by our People Services staff. It provided supervisors with opportunities to share experiences and expertise, and to collectively solve difficult problems and underperformance scenarios.

While supervisors are provided with assistance and advice from People Services staff, such training has led to increased confidence in addressing performance issues.

In November 2011, we conducted the annual AEC National and State Excellence Awards. Award ceremonies were held across the country to recognise and reward superior effort by AEC managers and staff during 2010–11.

Also throughout the year, managers rewarded staff at a local level. This enabled managers to promptly reward individual staff or teams for their efforts. Informal awards form part of our Recognition and Rewards Program, which is an ongoing program initiated through Investing in Our People.

Workplace diversity

As at 30 June 2012, we employed 2 065 ongoing, non-ongoing and irregular or intermittent employees at 132 different sites across Australia. This included our National Office and National Electoral Education Centre in Canberra, state and territory offices, and divisional offices, plus storage and warehouse locations.

In 2011–12, diversity statistics have remained relatively stable in all areas, except the number of staff self-identifying as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background (see Figure 10). In this category, the statistic has increased from 1.2 per cent to 2.8 per cent. A factor influencing this outcome is the continued IEPP, which is primarily staffed by people who have strong links to Indigenous communities around Australia.

Figure 10: Staff profile by self-identified category

Staff profile

ATSI = people with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds; CALD = people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds; PWD = people with disability.

Note: In each category, the rates relate to employees who choose to self-identify. Employees may be reported under more than one heading. Data excludes irregular or intermittent staff.

We have one of the oldest demographics of all APS agencies. Figure 11 illustrates the disproportionate ratio of older to younger employees as at 30 June 2012.

Figure 11: Staff by age group as at 30 June 2012

Staff by age group as at 30 June 2012

Note: Irregular or intermittent employees are not reported.

Table 45 provides a summary of our workforce.

Table 45: Our workforce at 30 June 2012 at a glance, excludes irregular or intermittent employees
Our 2011–12 workforce Statistic

Staff who worked full time hours

83 per cent

Staff who identified as having a linguistically diverse background

6.4 per cent

Female staff

66 per cent

Average age

47 years

Staff aged over 45 years

62 per cent

Average length of service for ongoing staff

9.4 years

Our Indigenous workforce

In 2012, we launched our first Reconciliation Action Plan, timed with the fiftieth anniversary of Indigenous Australians’ right to vote.

Our Reconciliation Action Plan outlines a practical program of activities to help staff build understanding, commitment and skills to deliver services that meet the needs and aspirations of Indigenous Australians. The plan was developed by a working group of staff from the IEPP and People Services Branch. It was endorsed by our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, the AEC Consultative Forum and Reconciliation Australia.

In our first year, we will:

  • build an online network to link all our Indigenous staff across Australia so they can more easily share knowledge, experience and solutions, and
  • ensure all staff undertake cultural awareness training.

As at 30 June 2012, 2.8 per cent of our staff identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This exceeds the Australian Government Indigenous employment target of 2.7 per cent. Refer to Figure 10 ‘Staff profile by self-identified category’. In line with the aim of our Reconciliation Action Plan, we hope to maintain, if not grow, this figure in the years ahead.

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